10 questions that won’t get you the job

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10 questions that won't get you the job

AS an executive recruiter with twenty-two years of expertise, interviewing freshers/Experienced to see if they are suitable for my client’s organization is literally a part of my daily routine.

Typically, a prospective employer can ask if you’ve got any queries. Here’s a summary of these that usually do not go down too well with the client, often due to that candidates aren’t selected.

1.”Can you tell me something regarding your company?” 

The employer is instantly put off! an aspiring candidate is meant to go to the company website and perceive its business model, products, services, history etc. Please read the section ‘About Us‘ where companies give their history, products, the geographies they serve etc. also visit the ‘Blog‘ section of the company, where you’ve got information regarding the latest product releases, what customers say about their product and any awards they have won, recently.

2. “Will you do a reference check?”

Most corporations use the services of a third-party agency to conduct a ‘reference check‘. the instant you pop this question, a red flag is hoisted because the interviewer might imagine you have something to hide.

3. “What is your leave policy?”

Don’t raise this question. it looks like you prefer to relax. while most companies talk of work-life balance, few follow them.

4. “Do you work on Saturdays?”

Avoid this question, because the employer gets a suspicion concerning your intentions to work exhausting.

5. when can I get my next increment?

This question causes you to appear ‘greedy’. Avoid asking it at this stage of the interview process. The employer thinks that you are looking at money all the time and thus can change jobs if offered a slightly higher pay.

6. “can you say whether you have other jobs in your organization?”

You may be offered a job, which you think that is below your aspirations. If you feel that the job is below your ability then say same directly at the interview.

7. “How soon can I able to move in a higher role?”

You may have been offered a sales role and you may have an interest in a marketing/brand management role. Asking this question has no meaning as you’re virtually saying to the employer “I don’t like this job”. Remember, most employers can keep you for a reasonable time within the offered role and relying upon your performance transfer you to a different role.

8. “May I know the most effective way of transport is to reach the office from my residence?”

Don’t raise this question! you can easily resolve the solution talking to people within the neighborhood and at the bus or terminus.

9. “Are there opportunities for promotion?”

Please do not raise this question throughout the interview. Once you be a part of the company and prove yourself, then you’ll be able to raise this issue together with your boss. In today’s job market, your priority should be to 1stget the job. It’s better to look for promotion subsequently.

10. “When do I start?”

Since you’re unsure that you are offered, don’t raise this question. The employer gets the feeling that you are overconfident and brash and will not suit them. a better means for job seekers to point out their interest is to be direct. they must tell the interviewer they’re terribly interested in being considered further for the position and offer to provide no matter further info the company may need.

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